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Do Bed Bugs Spread Coronavirus?

Coronavirus (scientifically known as COVID-19) has ravaged the world in this past year causing more fear than ever. Bed Bug levels have risen tremendously in the past year. The thought of having to deal with both of these matters is just too much to handle for some people, that is why we are here to explain.

Bed Bugs & Coronavirus

Since the introduction of COVID-19, we have been in a disarray to what actually this disease is and how it can actually spread. It is common for a person to think that insects as well can carry the disease since in past history they have been known to do so (i.e: Malaria). This fear of bites and other contact with such bugs can infiltrate your body with the disease has not yet been proven. In actuality bed bugs have not yet been proven to carry any disease let alone this one.


Then there is the animals and pet side to the conversation. Transmission by animals has been documented, so the second thought of your pet attracting the virus is definitely a cause for concern. The CDC specifies in research that COVID transmission through cats, dogs and other animals in one of the examples.


Although the evidence has not been shown we still suggest that caution should be required. Bed bugs can transmit bacteria and with physical interaction (such as bites) you can develop an infection if not treated right.

Bed Bugs are not known to spread disease

Unlike Mosquitos who have been labeled one of the deadliest creatures to carry disease. Bed bugs on the other hand have not been given that tittle, surprisingly though bed bugs are suspected of transmitting over 40 microorganisms. These infectious agents are strong candidates for disease transmission even via bed bugs.

Are Bed Bug Infestations Still on The Rise?

Unfortuantely yes, Bed Bug populations have been surging and projections think that even more so during this recent pandemic. Especially as outside starts to open back up and travel comes more prevalent.

THAT IS WHY WE ARE HERE

Eco Thermal Bed Bug Exterminators will get your bed bugs gone for good! Bed bugs can be extremely difficult for people that is why we are here. We specialize in the complete eradication of bed bug existence, so if you think that your experiencing bed bug life that please do not hesitate to give us a call.

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How Long For A Bed Bug Infestation To Develop?

One of the most common asked questions are “How long have I had bed bugs?” and with good reason. This question of course has layers but to be quite simple it is all up to the bed bugs, let me explain. For large or long-term infestations, it becomes unrealistic to determine the age of the infestation by observation alone. Confounding factors such as feeding frequency and reintroduction and treatment attempts all come into play. It is always safe to say that they have been present for some time (months or years). However, the age of small infestations can be gauged fairly well for the first couple months, and that is likely sufficient in many cases.

How to Check For Bed Bugs

A good guess, at normal room temperatures (72°F) combined ample feeding opportunity, bed bug nymphs require about a week for development of each instar between molts. Each molt leaves behind exuviae, the “shed skin.” In small infestations, these exuviae can be used to estimate a timeline. For instance this method is limited, but can be useful under the right circumstances. If on your mattress a fourth instar bug is found alone in a cluster along with some fecal spotting and three graduated exuviae, a reasonable guess would be that it has been using that harborage for at least two to three weeks.

 

Eggs take about 10 days to hatch at 72°F, so if you find hatched eggs attached to furniture, that is a clear indicator that they’ve been there for at least that long. Newer eggs can be collected, and upon hatching provide an estimation of when they were laid.

Another good barometer of how long an infestation has been around is the number of adult bed bugs present. Generally it takes at least seven weeks for a bed bug to grow from an egg to an adult, so there should be no new adults from eggs during that period. Therefore, if many adult bugs are present one can reasonably assume that the infestation has been there for more than seven weeks. The assumption here is that the infestation started from only a few bugs and there have not been additional introductions during that time. 

The bottom line is that while there isn’t a surefire way to determine the age of an infestation, you can determine some limits. It requires careful inspection of the available evidence including fecal spotting, exoskelton, eggs and adult bugs. That is why it is ideal to call professionals who know what exactly to look for.

CALL ECO THERMAL BED BUG EXTERMINATORS TO SCHEDULE AN INSPECTION TODAY

980-228-9317

Overton

1120 Wylam Dill Charlotte,
NC 28213
Ecothermalbedbug@gmail.com
(980) 228-9317

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Bed Bug Bites vs. Mosquito Bites

There has been confusion over the years of identifying the different types of bites a person can receive. Especially between Bed Bugs and Mosquitos. Properly distinguishing these two will let you know the necessary steps in order to eliminate these bugs.

How They Look

Every person reacts differently to bites but even though they have vast differences there are some similarities in the two. First the differences, some may not have any reaction to a Bed Bug bite but if so then you’ll recognize red areas that are raised, resembling a pimple-like form. Whereas a mosquito bites comes in all sizes with a white discoloration. Mosquito bites are also typically spread out on the body, while bed bug bites are usually clustered — forming a pattern or link to others (bites). Lastly it can take a few hours or days for bed bug bites to appear unlike mosquito bites where they can show up instantly.

The Importance

It is NECESSARY to discover whether or not you have bed bugs and the signs are not always the most clear cut. Bed Bugs can be anywhere in your home, not just the bedroom, so when searching, look throughout your home. Bed Bugs will try and outsmart you, meaning they’ll move around at a strategic pace and of course wait at night until your sleep. The bad thing about bed bugs is that they are year round.

However Mosquito bites are very seasonal creatures — mostly in warm temperatures, so you’ll run into these pest being outdoors. There are over 200 species in the mosquito family making them quite disperse but all seem to be active later in the day. Bites most often happen when next to bodies of water or outdoors for long periods of time, of course if you leave a window or door open they will enter your home no matter the temperature.

Comparison Chart

Bed Bug BitesMosquito Bites
Flat shaped welts filled with stained blood at the center.Oddly shaped welts that have reddish or pinkish boundaries.
Appearance
In a zigzag, or regular cluster like fashion.In an irregular, random and isolated fashion.
Duration
Lasts for several weeks.Lasts for several days.
Insect
A male and female bed bug that crawls.The only female mosquito that flies.
Occurrence
Irrespective of climate.Mostly in a warm climate.
Reaction
Itching, a few hours or days after the bite.Instant itching the moment a mosquito bites.
Location
Usually found on furniture, in shoes, clothing, beds, etc.Usually found in stagnant water, in the air, flying above lights.

Bed Bug & Mosquito Symptoms

Bed Bug symptoms are a little bit more difficult than Mosquito symptoms. In fact a person might not have any bed bug symptoms at all. However if an itch does occur then you might not see it for some time. Not only do bed bug bites take a few days to show up, they also take longer to go away — Anywhere from 3 days to 3 weeks. On the other hand Mosquito symptoms are easier to identify. If you start to develop an annoying itch out of nowhere than it was most likely a mosquito attack. In some cases you can develop a blister or skin infection but this is only after not treating your bite mark.

Treating Bed Bug & Mosquito Bites

Once being bitten you will need to clean the affected areas with cold water and soap. Keeping your skin clean reduces the chances of infection, If you start to experience discomfort or itching then apply a topical antibiotics (Benadryl Itch/Neosporin/etc.)

Similar to bed bug bites if you’ve been bitten clean the affected area. Apply an ice pack or something cold to the area in order to help the itching sensation and keep swelling down. You can also use a topical ointment if needed. Mosquito bites only last for a day or two.

FOR ALL QUESTIONS & CONCERNS CONTACT US AT 980-228-9317

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The Rise of Bed Bugs

Photo by Rachel Claire on Pexels.com

Should There Be Cause For Concern?

Since the 2000’s Bed Bugs have been growing at a rapid rate across the world. There are a few explanations that draw reasoning but nobody really truly knows.

Get a brief history of these meniscal terrors and try and find your own logic.

Read more…


This article uses material from the University of Kentucky article “Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment“,

Porter, M. F. (n.d.). Bed bugs. Retrieved February 04, 2021, from https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef636

Bed Bug Phobia

Be on the Look out!: How to tell where to find these crazy critters.

Waking up scratching like crazy? Not knowing where it’s coming from? These frustrations can drive you off the deep end. But doesn’t have to be that way.

Look right here in a thorough detail of how to find such annoying pest

Read more…


This article uses material from the Wikibooks article The Environmental Protection Agency”,

How to find bed bugs. (2018, October 31). Retrieved February 04, 2021, from https://www.epa.gov/bedbugs/how-find-bed-bugs